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Management Practices

Take Back Your Clients

Web Editor | July 10, 2011 | 3:13 PM

At the Salon Business Success Forum at ABS, top salon owners offer invaluable peer-to-peer advice.

At America’s Beauty Show more than 300 salon owners and managers packed the Salon Business Success Forum, hosted by ABS and P&G Salon Professional and powered by SALON TODAY. Reuben Carranza, CEO of P&G Professional, opened the forum by delving in the P&G data vault and offering up information that helps owners unravel the mysteries of today’s beauty consumer and shed light on the non-salon competition.

Take Back Your Clients
Audience members brought their toughest management questions to the salon owner panel, moderated by SALON TODAY Editor Stacey Soble.

“Large retail stores, such as CVS, Target, Walmart, and The Gap, have made mass retailing success because of their pristine displays. They have created an overall environment where people can stop and browse,” Carranza told attendees. “It’s time for us to take back our salon client, because she believes us first.”

Over the next hour, three salon owners took the stage, delivering powerful examples of how they’ve transformed their businesses.


Left: Eva Scrivo, owner of the Eva Scrivo Salon, suggests salons can make a lasting impression on their clients by educating and empowering
them. Right: Reuben Carranza, CEO of P&G Salon Professional, advises owners to be conscious of the buying behavior of the beauty enthusiast.
(Photos by Lauren Salapatek.)

• Deborah Schmidt, owner of the chain of Mitchell’s Salons and Spas in Cincinnati, Ohio, walked attendees through her process of understanding the target market and developing a business concept that lures them in. “Collect information on the target you want and you’ll begin to see patterns,” she said. “Everything has to match the image of your target client. Create a culture that your client can feel.”

• William George, owner of the James Joseph Salons in Boston, stressed that in addition to taking back your clients, you need to take back your staff. “Keeping a team together is tantamount to your success,” he cautioned. “It is important that as the salon’s owner, you take control of each and every meeting at your salon.”

• Eva Scrivo, owner of the Eva Scrivo Salon in New York, shared her strategy of establishing herself as the beauty expert. “Be the authority,” she advised. “Show your client exactly how to style their own hair. When you teach, share and give, the more you’ll get back.”

For the last hour of the forum, Frank Gironda, president of Cosmetologists Chicago and owner of the Frank Gironda Salons and Day Spas in Naperville, Illinois, and SALON TODAY 200 Honorees Jason Hall, co-owner of RED 7 Salons in Chicago, and Ginny Eramo, owner of Interlocks Salon and Day Spa in Boston, joined the speakers for a fast-paced panel session moderated by Stacey Soble, editor in chief of SALON TODAY.

Audience members fired away with their toughest management challenges and the panelists rose to the occasion, offering their best advice to their peers. “Be true to yourself,” said Hall. “Your business should be a reflection of you— never waiver from that.”


Originally posted on Salon Today.

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