Close
Management Practices

Getting New Employees to Retail

Laurel Nelson | July 10, 2011 | 1:34 PM

Getting New Employees to Retail

Getting new employees on the retail bandwagon can be difficult. However, some owners maintain they need to be in a retail state of mind before they start their first day of work.

“It should start even earlier,” says Patricia Owen, owner of the skin-focused Faces DaySpa, BeautyBoutique and SpaShoppe in Hilton Head, South Carolina. “We include questions about retailing in our interviewing process.”

Kristi Valenzuela, success coach, speaker and owner of the consulting firm Crystal Focus, Inc., suggests that can be as easy as handing the applicant a red pencil and asking her to attempt to sell you the product. “They may feel silly, but what you’re looking for is their willingness to try. If they push it aside and say they can’t do that, chances are they won’t attempt to retail your products either.”

Once you’ve made the hire, retail training needs to be an integral part of your orientation and training program. Valenzuela recommends developing a retailing system, writing it down in black and white, scripting the pitch, and role-playing the system during orientation. “Finally, draft an agreement that says they’ve been introduced to the system and agree to play by the rules, and ask new employees to sign it the first day. It makes them take retail seriously.”

But make sure all your employees play by the retail rules, or your new employees will quickly backslide into bad habits.

Valenzuela saw the power of an entire organization in retail action when she recently coached a salon in Round Beach, Illinois.

“Their retail to service ratio was a startling 23 percent, where the national average is about 8 percent,” she says. “We kept questioning the math, but found the ratio was right—so we took a hard look at the system. We found that when appointments were booked, the front desk advised clients of upcoming product specials. When clients checked in, they were again reminded of specials and told to ask their service providers what products would work best for them. Service providers talked about products during the service and at the shampoo bowl. At the end of the service, the service providers pulled recommended products and handed them to the client as they checked out. It’s solid and it’s brave, but because everyone in the salon did it, it didn’t feel uncomfortable, and it worked.”

Facebook Comments

More from Management Practices

Management Practices
Management Practices

SALON TODAY RECOMMENDS: 5 Articles on Solving Struggles in Retailing, Retention, Legislation and More

Elizabeth Jakaitis | June 16, 2017

Being a salon owner means managing the education of stylists, retention of staff, progress of profits and more. Inevitably, there are land mines in all of these areas and the path to success is not always clear. We've explored the Aveda Means Business blog and found stories of several salon owners who think outside the box to find solutions to common small-business struggles. Read about the areas where their businesses struggled and what they did to implement systems that work.

SALON TODAY RECOMMENDS: Salon Success Stories—Referrals, Retail, Online Booking and Hiring

Elizabeth Jakaitis | June 1, 2017

Salon ownership is about innovation; implementing new methods that will grow business and client satisfaction is key. At SALON TODAY, we're always on the lookout for accounts from salon owners on ways that they have made their business more efficient and profitable. Here are a collection of success stories gathered by Aveda Means Business which outline paths to gaining referrals, growing retail sales, implementing online booking and hiring smart.

Load More